Notes from the Audio Developer Conference

I’ve spent the last couple of days at the 2017 Audio Developer Conference organised by ROLI. This is a get-together and technical conference for people who work on audio software and software-driven-hardware, in practice mostly people working on music applications.

I don’t go to many conferences these days, despite working in academia. I don’t co-write many papers and I’m no longer funded by a project with a conference budget. I’ve been to a couple that we hosted ourselves at the Centre for Digital Music, but I think the last one I went to anywhere else was the 2014 Linux Audio Conference in Karlsruhe. I don’t mind this situation (I don’t like to travel away from my family anyway), I just mention it to give context for why a long-time academic employee like me should bother to write up a conference at all!

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Here are my notes — on things I liked and things I didn’t — in roughly chronological order.

The venue is interesting, quite fancy, and completely new to me. (It is called CodeNode.) I’m a bit boggled that there is such a big space right in the middle of the City given over to developer events. I probably shouldn’t be boggling at that any more, but I can’t help it.
Nice furniture too.

The attendees are amazingly homogeneous. I probably wouldn’t have even noticed this, back when I was tangentially involved in the commercial audio development world, as I was part of the homogeneity. But our research group is a fair bit more diverse and I’m a bit more perceptive now. From the attendance of this event, you would conclude that 98% of audio developers are male and 90% are white people from northern Europe.
When I have been involved in organising events in academia, we have found it hard to get a speaker lineup that is as diverse as the population of potential attendees (i.e. the classic all-male panel problem). I have failed badly at this, even when trying hard — I am definitely part of the problem when it comes to conference organisation. Here, though, my perception is the other way around: the speakers are a closer reflection of what I perceive as the actual population than the attendees are.

Talks I went to:

Day 2 (i.e. the first day of the talks):

  • The future is wide: SIMD, vector classes and branchless algorithms for audio synthesis by Angus Hewlett of FXpansion (now employed by ROLI). A topic I’m interested in and he has clearly done solid work on (see here), but it quickly reached the realms of tweaks I personally am probably never going to need. The most heartening lesson I learned was that compilers are getting better and better at auto-vectorisation.
  • Exploring time-frequency space with the Gaborator by Andreas Gustafsson. I loved this. It was about computing short-time constant-Q transforms of music audio and presenting the results in an interactive way. This is well-trodden territory: I have worked on more than one implementation of a constant-Q transform myself, and on visualising the results. But I really appreciated his dedication to optimising the transform (which appears to be quicker and more invertible than my best implementation) and his imagination in rendering it (reusing the Leaflet mapping API to display time-frequency “maps”). There is a demo of this here and I like it a lot.
    So I was sitting there thinking “yes! nice work!”, but when it came to the questions, it was apparent that people didn’t really get how nice it was. I wanted to pretend to ask a question, just in order to say “I like it!”. But I didn’t, and then I never managed to work up to introducing myself to Andreas afterwards. I feel bad and I wish I had.
  • The development of Ableton Live by Friedemann Schautz. This talk could only disappoint, after its title. But I had to attend anyway. It was a broad review of observations from the development of Live 10, and although I didn’t learn much, I did like Friedemann and thought I would happily work on a team he was running.
  • The amazing usefulness of band-limited impulse trains by Stefan Stenzel of Waldorf. This was a nice old-school piece. Who can resist an impulse train? Not I.
  • Some interesting phenomena in nonlinear oscillators by André Bergner of Native Instruments. André is a compelling speaker who uses hand-drawn slides (I approve) and this was a neat mathematical talk, though I wasn’t able to stay to the end of it.

Day 3 (second and final day of talks):

  • The human in the musical loop (keynote) by Elaine Chew. Elaine is a professor in my group and I know some of her work quite well, but her keynote was exactly what I needed at this time, first thing in the morning on the second day. After a day of bits-driven talks, this was a piece about performers and listeners from someone who is technologically adept herself, and curious, but talks about music first. Elaine is also very calm, which was useful when the projector hardware gave up during her talk and stopped working for a good few minutes. I think as a result she had to hurry the closing topic (about the heartbeat project) which was a pity, as it could have been fascinating to have expanded on this a bit more.
    Some of what Elaine talked about was more than a decade old, and I think this is one of the purposes of professors: to recall, and to be able to communicate, relevant stuff that happened longer ago than any current research student remembers.
  • The new C++17, and why it is good for you by Timur Doumler. The polar opposite of Elaine’s talk, but I was now well-cushioned for it. C++17 continues down the road of simplifying the “modern-language” capabilities C++ has been acquiring since C++11. Most memorable for me are destructuring bind, guaranteed copy elision on value return, variant types, and filesystem support in the standard library.
    Destructuring bind is interesting and I’ve written about it separately.
  • The use of std::variant in realtime DSP by Ian Hobson. A 50-minute slot, for a talk about which Timur Doumler’s earlier talk had already given away the twist! (Yes you can use std::variant, it doesn’t do any heap allocation.) Ambitious. This was a most satisfying talk anyway, as it was all about performance measurements and other very concrete stuff. No mention of the Expression Problem though.
  • Reactive Extensions (Rx) in JUCE by Martin Finke. I have never used either React or JUCE so I thought this would be perfect for me. I had a question lined up: “What is JUCE?” but I didn’t dare use it. The talk was perfectly comprehensible and quite enlightening though, so my silly bit of attitude was quite misplaced. I may even end up using some of what I learned in it.

 

Sonic Visualiser 3.0, at last

Finally!

(See previous posts: Help test the Sonic Visualiser v3.0 beta, A second beta of Sonic Visualiser v3.0, A third beta of Sonic Visualiser v3.0, and Yes, there’s a fourth beta of Sonic Visualiser v3.0 now)

No doubt, now that the official release is out, some horrible problem or other will come to light. It wouldn’t be the first time: Sonic Visualiser v2.4 went through a beta programme before release and still had to be replaced with v2.4.1 after only a week. These things happen and that’s OK, but for now I’m feeling good about this one.

 

Yes, there’s a fourth beta of Sonic Visualiser v3.0 now

Previously I wrote about the third Sonic Visualiser v3.0 beta release:

“This may well be the final beta, so if you’re seeing problems with it, please do report them while there’s still time!”

Well some very kind people did report problems, and so that was not the final beta. A fourth one is now up for download. Here are the download URLs:

Fixes since the third beta

  • Fix a nasty crash in session I/O in the 64-bit Windows build (this is the main reason for the new beta)
  • Provide more log information about audio drivers to the debug log file
  • Fix a very occasional one-sample-too-short error in resampling audio files during load
  • Fix invisible measure tool crosshairs on spectrogram
  • Fix a possible memory leak in the spectrogram

Keep the bug reports coming!

This one really could be the final beta! So please do report any troubles you have with it. Drop me a line, post a comment below this article, or use the SourceForge bug tracker. And thank you!

 

A third beta of Sonic Visualiser v3.0

Update – 23rd Feb: We have a fourth beta now!

After a short break, we have a third beta of the forthcoming v3.0 release of Sonic Visualiser. Downloads here:

Bugs fixed, and other changes made since the second beta

  • Sonic Visualiser could hang when trying to initialise a transform that refused the first choice of initialisation parameters
  • Error handling for problems in running transforms has been improved in general
  • The Colour 3D Plot layer was sometimes pathologically slow to update
  • The “Normalise Visible Area” option in the Colour 3D Plot layer wasn’t working
  • The visual rendering style of some layers has been improved when viewed on high-resolution screens without pixel doubling
  • A new feature has snuck in, under cover of fixing a rendering offset problem in the spectrum layer: it is now possible (although cumbersome) to zoom the spectrum layer in the frequency axis
  • The process of overhauling the Help Reference documentation to properly describe the new release has begun

Let us know what else you find!

This may well be the final beta, so if you’re seeing problems with it, please do report them while there’s still time!

Drop me a line, post a comment below this article, or use the SourceForge bug tracker.

(This post is a follow-up to “Help test the Sonic Visualiser v3.0 beta” and “A second beta of Sonic Visualiser v3.0“.)

A second beta of Sonic Visualiser v3.0

Update – 9th Feb: There is now a third beta! See here for details.

Here’s a second beta release of Sonic Visualiser v3.0:

Bugs found in the first beta and fixed for the second

  • The peak-frequency spectrogram rendered the entire track into the first 1/8th of its length, and showed nothing after that. (The cause of this might make a marginally interesting technical post in its own right)
  • A similar effect was exhibited by Colour 3D Plot layers, but only at very close zoom levels
  • When the Windows build had been used to view an mp3 file, it would subsequently crash on exit
  • All platforms could hang on startup if certain plugins were installed (the Fan Chirp plugin from the Universidad de la República in Uruguay was one example, though it wasn’t the fault of the plugin)
  • The playback/record level meters were very flickery
  • The source package didn’t build on Fedora Linux

What other problems have you spotted?

Let us know! Drop me a line, post a comment below this article, or use the SourceForge bug tracker.

(This post is a follow-up to “Help test the Sonic Visualiser v3.0 beta“)

Help test the Sonic Visualiser v3.0 beta

A first beta release of Sonic Visualiser v3.0 is now available for download, and we’d love to get your feedback.

Sonic Visualiser v3.0beta1 on Windows

Sonic Visualiser is a free, open-source desktop application for close study and annotation of music audio recordings, developed in the Centre for Digital Music at Queen Mary, University of London. It’s been available for about a decade now, and v3.0 will be one of the most substantial updates it’s ever had. This should be a really good release, but we need to hear about the problems other people have with the beta versions before we can be sure of that.

Get it here

Update – 17th Jan: These are not the latest links any more: there is now a second beta! See here for details.

The first beta can be downloaded from the Sound Software code site:

There will be Linux binaries as well, but I’m still working on packaging for those. Watch this space. (Update: there is now an Ubuntu package linked above. I’d like to be making more options available, not least because I don’t actually use Ubuntu myself, but this is a start.)

Note that the beta pops up a dialog each time you run it to remind you that it’s a beta. Sorry about that, I know it might be annoying.

What’s changed

Here’s the list of changes since the last release.

Besides some new features and a lot of bug fixes, there are a few interesting internal changes:

  • Everything to do with sample indexing now uses 64-bit offsets, and it’s possible to load very long audio files that wouldn’t have worked in the previous release
  • Audio analysis plugins are now run with process separation so a misbehaving plugin should no longer be able to crash the host
  • It’s now possible to record audio as well as play it, and to select the record and playback devices in the preferences
  • The user interface now adapts fully to hi-dpi (“retina”) displays on all three platforms
  • For the first time the Windows version is natively 64-bit (if your Windows installation is, and almost all Windows installations are nowadays) — while still being able to use any 32-bit Vamp plugins you have installed

I’m quite excited about this release, so now I need to hear all your deflating reports about the things that aren’t working!

What we particularly need feedback on

  • Problems installing or running the application at all!
  • Problems running plugins that worked with a previous version
  • Problems playing or recording audio, glitches, error dialogs with complaints about audio drivers
  • Any crashes or other error dialogs
  • Any unexpectedly slow performance while showing analyses or running plugins

Note for Linux users

I mentioned above that I’m still working on packaging for Linux. That process also includes overhauling the INSTALL-file instructions, which are not quite up-to-date. If you look at the series of commands carried out in the Docker script at deploy/linux/docker/Dockerfile.ubuntu64 in the source tree, you’ll get an idea of what needs to be done to compile as things stand.

How to report problems

Use the venerable SourceForge bug tracker, or for quick reports you could just post a comment below, send me an email, tweet at me, etc.

For any problems that arise when using a specific file (audio or annotation), it’s massively helpful if you can attach an example file that exhibits the problem. In general, listing any steps to take to reproduce a bug (even if it seems to you that the bug must be so obvious that nobody could ever have missed it) is very useful indeed.

If you run into something and you’re not sure whether it’s a bug or you’re just being stupid, please do report it anyway. A program that makes you feel stupid is already wrong on some level, though I’m all too aware that Sonic Visualiser can do that sometimes because it is a bit overcomplicated in places.

Things we haven’t done yet

We had hoped to devise an easier way to obtain and install plugins in time for this release, and recent survey feedback suggested this would be a very welcome thing for many prospective users. Sadly we haven’t been able to do anything in that area yet, but I hope we may be able to soon.